Mental Health While Working in Project Management

This is a series of blogs which attempts to talk about stigma existence and stigma reduction in a particular field of work – project management.  Beginning in 2002, I became certified as a Project Management Professional.  This feat was subsequent to obtaining my college degree and my Masters in Business Administration.  In this series of blogposts, I will talk about several issues including: 1) being accepted (or not) for having a mental disorder while serving as a project manager, 2) addressing stigma associated with a mental health diagnosis while practicing as a project management professional, 3) learning to adopt risk management principles from project management principles to self-care and risk management with a mental health diagnosis,  4) detailing work places and individuals that seemed accepting of mental health diagnosis either before, during or after practicing as a project manager full-time,  5) balancing two or more projects versus one project while being diagnosed with a severe mental illness, 6) calculating the rewards and the challenges associated with compartmentalizing mental health issues while serving as a project management professional, 7) relaying the benefits of openly discussing the impacts of mental illness on my ability to serve as a project manager, and 8) detailing specific examples of prejudice in the workplace due to a mental health diagnosis.    

Some of the material may seem redundant as I have experienced repeatedly non-acceptance in the field of project management for mental health in general and for mental health diagnoses in particular. 

One home project at a time

Since the end of July / beginning of August and largely due to covid-19, I have been embarking on a prioritized home project every week to ten days. It feels good to accomplish projects with a beginning, a middle and an end. I can check them off my list which is great. I can also enjoy the added sense of new homey touches for home enjoyment and decluttering our living spaces.

At first it was being sure my daughter had a good place to do her remote learning. We set up an existing table as a desk for her, got a new rug, added a new pillow, and cleared the room of most of the clutter. Another project was sprucing up the back porch by adding two new jade plants. An additional project was adding two new plants to my daughter’s room – a peace plant and a pothos or fast-growing climber. Another more costly project was getting a new dining room rug since we will soon be inheriting a new dining room table from my mother who is downsizing to go into a facility for the elderly. This took a lot of work and some not so subtle swearing from my husband and me to get centered into the dining room. In addition, I have been cutting the back and front yard every week to ten days this summer and attending to flowers out front of the house. The outside of the house looks nice. It is looking nicer with each project completed inside as well.

For the most part these projects have not been too expensive. Going to discount stores for pillows and decorative accents and to Home Depot for plants helps with the price side of the equation for sprucing up the home. A new plant or a candle can do great things to brighten up your living room or other area where you spend a lot of time.

In addition to home projects, I like to check off my list the regular weekly chores as projects as well. This includes things like grocery shopping, watering plants, vacuuming the downstairs, cleaning the bathrooms, paying bills, getting a pescatarian meal on the table each day, doing the laundry, and other regular maintenance activities. I feel I need to give myself credit for those tasks as well even though they are more maintenance and less of home projects. There are times when I don’t feel motivated to take on a new home project so I have to give myself credit for getting maintenance work done during those times. It is nice that my husband thanks me when I am doing these chores and that he is aware of those contributions.

Other home projects on the horizon include: getting mums for the fall for the front porch to replace the current flowers, getting the dining room table from my Mom, putting down a new living room rug from my Mom, organizing my closet, organizing the kitchen towels and napkins and place mats, etc. I hope to get a further list together in the next few weeks.

Overall, I have to say that having home projects and regular maintenance projects to do is one way of combatting cabin fever due to covid-19. They give purpose to the day and they end up making the home a more comfortable place to be. And that is important because at home is where we need to be now and for the foreseeable future.

What is your take on home projects during covid? Are you in maintenance mode with weekly chores which is still a fantastic accomplishment! ? Or can you tackle a small home improvement project here and there? Not on the scale of official remodeling but more along the lines of decluttering a family space or adding a new touch of color with a candle or a plant or some such small gesture?